State releases high school exit exam results

first_img 165Let’s talk business.Catch up on the business news closest to you with our daily newsletter. Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WHITTIER – State officials have released the 2006-07 results of the California High School Exit Exam, a 10th-grade level test in English-language arts and math that must be passed in order for high-schoolers to receive their diplomas. Statewide, officials said about 93 percent of the Class of 2007 passed both portions of the exam. Locally, more than 98 percent of nearly 4,900 Whittier-area graduating seniors were able to pass the state’s high school exit exam this year. Officials from local school districts say they’re also seeing more of their students passing the CAHSEE earlier. Students take the exit exam for the first time in 10th grade, then get two additional chances to pass in their junior year and three chances in their senior year. For more on this story, pick up a copy of tomorrow’s Whittier Daily News.last_img read more

Barricade vexes Texans

first_imgMISSION, Texas – Jeff Reed offers outdoor dining on the Rio Grande at his restaurant, Pepe’s on the River. But with the U.S. government planning to build 700 miles of fence along the Mexican border, he has to wonder: Will his restaurant soon be “Pepe’s on the Fence”? Downriver in Brownsville, where the jalape o and lima bean fields run down to the water’s edge, farmer Fermin Leal is wondering whether the government intends to cut through his crops, run irrigation pipes under the fence or buy him out. “Most of our land goes up to what’s supposed to be the border, and yes, we need access to river water,” Leal said. President George W. Bush signed a law Thursday to erect more fences along the border to secure it against illegal immigrants, drug smugglers and terrorists. Republicans in Congress see it as their most significant accomplishment on immigration. The president called it “an important step in our nation’s efforts to secure our borders.” AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESurfer attacked by shark near Channel Islands calls rescue a ‘Christmas miracle’But up and down Texas’ watery boundary with Mexico, farmers, ranchers and business owners are worried a fence will endanger their livelihoods and encroach on their property. Texas landowners – sick of illegal immigrants cutting their fences, stealing and trespassing, and tired of worrying about smugglers of humans and drugs endangering their families – have been demanding for years that Congress tighten the border. But not, some say, with a double-layer, $6 billion fence cutting through their land and keeping them and their livestock from the river. “It’s not going to work in Texas,” said Michael Vickers, who owns a cattle ranch on the border. “Who wants to close off the river to Mexico? The river is the lifeblood for a lot of cities.” Vickers said he worries that either his land will be cut off from the rest of the state and the country or he will lose access to 50 acres of water rights he has and can sell to area municipalities for up to $2,000 an acre. “I’d be in a DMZ-type zone, in between two countries,” Vickers said. The exact route the fences will take is not yet clear. And it is not yet known what the fences will look like – how tall they will be; whether they will be solid walls, or bars. Much of the land along the Texas side of the river is privately owned, some dating back to Spanish land grants.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more