Laila Ali on gender-breaking ballot for Boxing Hall of Fame

first_imgHiguain, Ronaldo help Juventus beat Leverkusen 3-0 LOOK: Taal Volcano island 2 days after eruption Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Taal Volcano eruption: House to develop rehab plan for Batangas, Cavite, Laguna SEA GAMES 2019: PH’s Nesthy Petecio boxing featherweight final (HIGHLIGHTS) PLAY LIST 02:11SEA GAMES 2019: PH’s Nesthy Petecio boxing featherweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)03:47PH’s Charly Suarez boxing lightweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)03:24PH’s James Palicte boxing light welterweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)01:04Daybreak as smoke, ash billows from Taal volcano01:05Poor visibility, nakaapekto sa maraming lugar sa Batangas03:028,000 pulis sa Region 4-A, tuloy ang trabaho03:57Phivolcs, nahihirapan sa komunikasyon sa Taal01:04Sold-out: Stores run out of face masks after Taal spews ash01:45Iran police shoot at those protesting plane shootdown FILE – Laila Ali speaks onstage at Sports Illustrated 2018 Sportsperson of the Year Awards Show on Tuesday, December 11, 2018 at The Beverly Hilton in Los Angeles. Rich Polk/Getty Images for Sports Illustrated/AFPCANASTOTA, N.Y. — Laila Ali is among the first female fighters to appear on the ballot for the 2020 class of the International Boxing Hall of Fame.The daughter of Muhammad Ali was joined by 11 others Tuesday for an international panel of voters: Sumya Anani, Regina Halmich, Holly Holm, Susi Kentikian, Christy Martin, Lucia Rijker, Jisselle Salandy, Mary Jo Sanders, Laura Serrano, Ana Maria Torres and Ann Wolfe.ADVERTISEMENT Francis Kong, Jason Magbanua headline ‘The School for the Passionate, New Bold U 2020’ Negros Occidental gov’t, church call for prayers for safety of Taal evacuees ‘People evacuated on their own’ LOOK: Chilling Adventures of Sabrina Part 3 takes you straight to hell with a Music Video and First Look-Images Bernard Hopkins, Shane Mosley and Timothy Bradley are among the dozen boxers added to the men’s modern ballot for 2020. The others are Jorge Arce, Vuyani Bungu, Joel Casamayor, Diego Corrales, Carl Froch, Sergio Martinez, Juan Manuel Marquez, Antonio Tarver and Israel Vazquez.Balloting results will be announced in December. Induction is June 14 in Canastota, New York.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSAndray Blatche has high praise for teammate Kai SottoSPORTSBig differenceSPORTSAlmazan status stays uncertain ahead of Game 4 No need to wear face masks in Metro Manila, says scientist MOST READ LATEST STORIES Taal Volcano’s lava fountain weakens, but Phivolcs says it’s not sign of slowing down View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

Turning Diatoms Into Nanodevices

first_imgTiny shells can be engineered into a variety of minute devices, claims a team of scientists. The team has demonstrated a way to transform the silicon dioxide shells of diatoms, one-celled algae, into magnesium oxide. The trick could lead to miniature sensors, drug-delivery capsules, and other devices.For years, Kenneth Sandhage, a materials chemist at Ohio State University in Columbus, has worked to develop ways to modify the chemistry of preshaped ceramic materials. Sandhage’s work took him to Germany, where by chance he met marine biologist Monica Schoenwaelder, from the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in Bremerhaven. After hearing Schoenwaelder describe the elegant microshells created by diatoms, Sandhage realized that they could make “great preforms for three-dimensional microdevices,” he says.The 100,000 or so species of diatoms vary in size from less than a micrometer to a few millimeters and are notable for their intricate features and exotic shapes. “Many of those shapes are not too far off from what you would want for practical applications,” says Sandhage. But natural shell material isn’t ideal for all nanodevices.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)To replace the silica with more useful materials, Sandhage and his colleagues heated Aulacoseira diatom shells to 900 degrees Celsius in an atmosphere of magnesium gas. The magnesium fully displaced the silicon in the shell, leaving a perfectly formed cylinder of magnesium oxide, the team reports in the 18 March issue of Advanced Materials. Although the magnesium oxide “shells” could be useful as heavy metal waste removers or as a friction additive in brake linings, Sandhage says the technique should also work for a wide range of other materials. He has recently teamed up with a pharmacologist to develop minute drug delivery capsules using shells based on calcium oxide compounds, which, unlike silica, can be readily absorbed by the body.The technique is “very likely” to have real-world applications, says Morley Stone, a biochemist at the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio. “This work fills an important void,” says Stone, because it “enables one to make a complicated silica structure and convert it into another oxide with more desirable properties.” Eventually, says Sandhage, scientists may even seek to “tinker with the DNA of diatoms to make tailored shapes.”Related sitesSandhage’s siteA large collection of diatom imageslast_img read more

Packer New visa model needed for Chinese tourists

first_img“The dollar’s at 91 cents because of China, not because of America, and we all benefit from that, so let’s not be hypocrites, “I don’t think we’re in a Cold War anymore,” Mr Packer said. Mr Packer said that 70 nationalities can apply for Australian visas online but not Chinese people and that this rule was anachronistic, the Macau Business reported. Australian Gambling magnate James Packer has said that Chinese tourist conditions need to be changed to be the same as other nationalities. “The visa processing system for Chinese tourists has recently improved but there’s more work to do in this area and each day we waste costs Australia a great amount of tourism dollars,center_img “The fact that visas are done in English, not Mandarin, that’s stupid. The fact that they’re not done online, that’s stupid.” Mr Packer also believes that it should be easier for wealthy Chinese to get travel documents.  Source = ETB News: Tom Nealelast_img read more